February Newsletter

February Newsletter

Dear readers,

Thanks for always being a pal and never a stranger.

Meeting new people has become such a rare occasion that I find myself mumbling when I come across a new human. Again, I am an awkward child, talking about the latest puzzle I have conquered or explained a funny TikTok video so poorly that it’s not even funny in my head anymore.

However, I will persist. I know that deep personal connections and small, seemingly inconsequential actions add up over time. Displaying personal relationships and data to communicate a particular message in a film connects strangers to a common cause.

That is why this awkward child will continue to beat the Carbon Trace Productions’ drum.

16 Weeks |Teaser| from Carbon Trace Productions on Vimeo.

The wait is over! The teaser for “16 Weeks” is finally here. Please take a look and share it with your friends.

Director: Greta Cross
Producer: Diana Dudenhoeffer

We will be in Shannon County in March. We are hosting a special pop-up interview session on Sunday, March 14th, at J&B’s Olde Tyme Family Restaurant in Eminence. Besides that, we will be filming a family of interest, visiting the “Gore Cabin,” and meeting with some loggers from the area.
Ask me how you can help!

We are back to regularly filming at Eden Village. We were recently able to follow a man who will hopefully become a resident at Eden Village Two soon. We saw firsthand how he lives his life on the street and were able to speak with him about his excitement about having his bed for the first time in a decade. This project proves each person has their own story to tell and deserves respect and kindness.

Welcome, Keely Flanigan, this semester’s production intern!
Keely Flanagan is a freshman at Missouri State University and is majoring in Digital Film and Television Production. She says she is looking forward to telling the stories Carbon Trace is working on and hopefully telling her own stories in the future.

Copyright © *2021* *Carbon Trace Productions*, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is:
*1330 E Cherry St #104, Springfield, MO 65802*

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Have you ever wondered what is going on with certain projects done by Carbon Trace Productions?

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Support Nonprofit Documentary Filmmaking:

Carbon Trace can provide significant guidance in developing, funding, producing, and distributing a documentary film. For high school students wishing to learn more about documentary filmmaking, Missouri State University offers degrees in digital filmmaking, media production, journalism, and other associated areas.

To participate in the documentary education provided through the Carbon Trace Team, we encourage you to apply for a filmmaking internship, submit a documentary idea, or apply to become a volunteer using the forms below.

Join Carbon Trace as a student volunteer

Apply for an internship

Submit a documentary idea

 

 

 

 

Interludes Help You Guide the Audience

Interludes Help You Guide the Audience

Creating an interlude in a documentary film is, for me, about creating space.

I usually want to create a space for a transition between acts or themes, for example. You may be asking: But isn’t the transition itself this “space” of which you speak? Well, no. I’m using the concept of “space” to indicate a place where a particular thematic goal that I wish to achieve occurs in a documentary film.

An interlude helps me bring the audience out of one way of thinking and feeling into another way of thinking and feeling by way of a route I create – a space I create – in the film.

There are, obviously, many other reasons to use interludes.

For example, interludes can also be used to tell a powerful visual story as an extended sequence. In other words, give your audience a break from words – especially when you have strong visuals that get the job done. I’ve used interludes for this reason, too.

While an interlude can be a transition, not all transitions are interludes because “interlude” denotes an intervening period of time. Transitions are typically fleeting. When they move beyond fleeting, we have entered the space of interlude.

How long should an interlude last? The answer depends entirely on the story you’re telling and the journey you wish your audience to make.

I prefer musical interludes with cues written or chosen, specifically for the audience’s journey to make across space in the frame. Now is not the time for talking.

 

You’ll see two interludes in the example video. The first is from the latest film by Carbon Trace Productions called A Vietnam Peace Story. It is the transition between acts 2 and 3.  In act 2, the former Marines traveling to Vietnam visit tourist sites and interact with the Vietnamese people. But act 3 is about visiting the site of a desperate battle that affects them deeply, even traumatically, to this day. I want the audience to finish processing what they have seen in act 2: Vietnam is a place and a people and no longer a war.

The concluding shot of the transition – the time-lapse of Hanoi at night – contrasts with and leads into the close-up of checking the map at the amphibious landing site where the men first entered Vietnam. I like that movement from the concluding, establishing shot to the detail. I like the finality of the concluding shot and how it works naturally with a fade to black.

The second interlude is a work in progress for an experimental documentary short about riding Trans-Siberian Railroad.

I’m using this interlude for the second reason I stated above: to create a short visual story. The interlude is illustrating some of the things the subjects are talking about preceding and following the interlude. I’m using the interlude instead of b-roll over the short interview sections in part because – on the bumpy train with the ever-changing natural light and constant train ambient – the interviews are visually interesting in themselves. I chose classical music by a Russian composer and slowed all the footage to create a dream-like, memory-like feel. The concluding shot of the guy moving back into his cabin will take us back into a cabin to speak with the subjects.

The first interlude has been precisely timed because the music was written specifically for the interlude. Since there’s no budget for original music for a short, experimental film, I chose music from our stock service, and I am editing to fit the music. As you can see (hear), I have more work to do.

 

 

Support Nonprofit Documentary Filmmaking:

Carbon Trace can provide significant guidance in developing, funding, producing, and distributing a documentary film. For high school students wishing to learn more about documentary filmmaking, Missouri State University offers degrees in digital filmmaking, media production, journalism, and other associated areas.

To participate in the documentary education provided through the Carbon Trace Team, we encourage you to apply for a filmmaking internship, submit a documentary idea, or apply to become a volunteer using the forms below.

Join Carbon Trace as a student volunteer

Apply for an internship

Submit a documentary idea