Souriyat: A Documentary Short

Souriyat: A Documentary Short

Souriyat is a documentary short we did back in 2017.

It is about the work of Souriyat Across Borders in Amman, Jordan — offering rehabilitation services to men and boys wounded in the Syrian civil war.

This film is just one of the inspiring stories we were able to witness and record. There are so many more to tell.

Many of our documentary films feature humanitarian organizations or individuals working to make the world a better place:

  • Witness at Tornillo: The story of one man standing up for justice and starting a movement to free asylum-seeking children from an internment camp.
  • Songs From the Street: A story of homeless people finding visibility and community through choir.
  • Syrian Doctor (working title): In post-production now. A story of the mental health crisis in Syrian refugee children.
  • A Vietnam Peace Story: A story of the internal conflict and growth of U.S. veterans returning to Vietnam.
  • Witness at the Border:  A story of the Central Americans forced to wait for months or years for an asylum hearing in a makeshift and dangerous refugee camp because new U.S. federal policies.
  • All of a Sudden: In production now. The story of the emotional and social transition that occurs when a chronically homeless person receives a permanent home.

Support Nonprofit Documentary Filmmaking:

Carbon Trace can provide significant guidance in developing, funding, producing, and distributing a documentary film. For high school students wishing to learn more about documentary filmmaking, Missouri State University offers degrees in digital filmmaking, media production, journalism, and other associated areas.

To participate in the documentary education provided through the Carbon Trace Team, we encourage you to apply for a filmmaking internship, submit a documentary idea, or apply to become a volunteer using the forms below.

Join Carbon Trace as a student volunteer

Apply for an internship

Submit a documentary idea

Bill and Bette Byrne are posing for a photo. Bill is holding their newborn baby Gretchen and their black Labrador looking dog is in the photo looking as if he is going to give Bette a sick on the chin.

A Love Story for the Ages

Bill and Bette Byrne are posing for a photo. Bill is holding their newborn baby Gretchen and their black Labrador looking dog is in the photo looking as if he is going to give Bette a sick on the chin.
Bill and Bette Byrne: Summer of 73

 

Bill and Bette: A love story for the ages.

These two former “Back to the Landers” in Shannon County, Missouri, are two of the smartest and most humble people the Carbon Trace team has ever come across. We can’t wait to tell their story and others with “A Portrait of the Ozarks.”

Forty years ago, life in Shannon County, Missouri, was preserved through two documentaries created by MSU’s Center for Ozarks Studies. These filmsSet in the 1980's, Bill and Bette Byrne are sitting at a table with their two year old daughter on their lap. There are two brown coffee mugs on the table. continue to be immensely popular; the current versions on YouTube have received over a quarter of a million views each in the last 5 years, with many comments asking what Shannon County is like today or making assumptions about the community. Bill and Bette both had a short highlight in the film, but they may play a much bigger role in this new production. 

The Department of Media, Journalism, and Film at Missouri State University, the University Libraries, and Carbon Trace Productions are partnering to revisit this area of Missouri in search of the indicators of social and economic conditions in rural areas. We want to go beyond county-level population trends, employment, income, and poverty to see who the people still live in such a rural part of the state. 

The Byrnes are a fascinating family to follow as they were “newcomers” in the former films. Today, these people are ingrained in the Shannon County Community. Both are looked up to as respected, helpful, and friendly folks who have given their lives to help others. Our film will explore the cultural heritage aspects of the Ozarks and the softer side of traditionalism, and the concept of family in rural America.   

The project will grow from the project partners’ expertise, students’ and alumni’s participation, and the input from supporters currently in Shannon County. We hope to shed light on stereotypes and assumptions of the rural Ozarks and evaluate the increasing political divide in the United States between urban and rural in the microcosm of a rural county.

Funding is being sought through various granting agencies, including the NEH, completing the film in its entirety. However, time is of the essence as we would like to begin reaching out to the community’s aging members who were part of the original film. If you would like to help, give our Executive Director a call at 816-872-6789. 

Bill and Bette Byrnes of today are standing by a pond. Bill is looking at Bette, she is smiling.
07/30/2020 — Eminence MO — Stills and video of Crystal Creek Ranch owners Bob and Bette Byrnes for “Portrait of the Ozarks.” (back to the landers in the original film) with Andy Cline and Shannon Cay.
© 2020 Jym Wilson/Carbon Trace Productions

 

 

An Update from “Songs From the Street”

An Update from “Songs From the Street”

The crew from Songs From the Street rings in the new year with this follow-up interview with Paul from the Springfield Street Choir.

He talks about how he’s grown since filming and advocates for the homeless population of Springfield.

Please go to https://www.theconnectinggrounds.com/ for outreach resources.

Also, Exciting news!

The was recently won their first prize at the Spotlight Documentary Film Awards!

Special thanks to everyone who has supported the film so far. Stay tuned for more exciting announcements!

Video Transcript:

“I’m Paul. I am a member of the Street Choir.

I was homeless until about 8 months ago when my mom let me back into her home if I was off drugs and alcohol. So, I decided to get clean and back on my medication.  

I am off the streets 8 months clean and sober, living the dream. 

This time last year Bob Love took me to the hospital for detox. I took three days in the hospital and right back out to the streets and right back to drugs and alcohol. 

It took until Feb 17 of 2019 for me to walk away from drugs and alcohol- and that is how long it has been. 

I am happy. I am content. I know there is more to do and more will happen the more I am willing to let God use me. Yeah, I am proud to be a part of it. 

I am still active in the church and in the outreach. Being sober now has given me a chance to put back into the community outreach that I took from when I was on the streets.

We are doing amazing things. Cold weather is coming on. We need volunteers for shelters to work overnight hours and stuff like that. 

We are advocating for hot hands and fresh socks.  When you are homeless walking in the same pair of socks for a week, and they are wet and cold, a fresh pair is like walking on a cloud. 

We need people from the community to vote to elect city leaders who recognize homelessness with solutions and not just a problem and to legally find refuge when they can.  We have nowhere to go inside. We just have to keep journeying on without getting a loitering charge. Even in city parks during city hours, we get ran off due to congregation.  

I am thankful for the church, the outreach, and the street choir. It brought the homeless community together in a positive way. Now that we have moved locations, there is a lot more to be done.” 

Support Nonprofit Documentary Filmmaking:

Check out our Patreon memberships. At the $5 per month level of support, you get free VIP codes for all Carbon Trace pay-per-view movies, including the right to download a copy to keep! It’s a great way to watch our documentary films while supporting our nonprofit mission of documentary education and humanitarian service.

Carbon Trace can provide significant guidance in developing, funding, producing, and distributing a documentary film. For high school students wishing to learn more about documentary filmmaking, Missouri State University offers degrees in digital filmmaking, media production, journalism, and other associated areas.

To participate in the documentary education provided through the Carbon Trace Team, we encourage you to apply for a filmmaking internship, submit a documentary idea, or apply to become a volunteer using the forms below.

Join Carbon Trace as a student volunteer

Apply for an internship

Submit a documentary idea